Wednesday, February 16, 2011

The Sazerac

Although it's a minor travesty, I had never had a Sazerac until last year. However, it's now one of my favorite drinks to make, and I feel like it's one of the most underrated out there. In honor of Mardi Gras being just around the corner, I thought I would whip one up and raise a toast.

Commonly known as America's oldest cocktail, it was invented in New Orleans around the middle of the 19th century. The ingredient list is pretty simple, with just sugar, Peychaud's bitters, rye whiskey, and absinthe, but the details are in the way that it's put together. I'm not going to attempt to describe the process of how to make it because Chris McMillan from the Library Lounge did such a great job doing it in the video below. Watch the video and make yourself one this weekend.

Speaking of Sazeracs, be sure to check out Ryan Waldron's series on the Krewes of Mardi Gras over on his blog, Seersuckers and Sazeracs.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good post. If you want a good a good Sazerac, and you live in Atlanta, try Leon's in downtown Decatur. Them seem to get it right most of the time.

Ryan Waldron said...

Thanks for the link. Rather than sugar, I prefer simple syrup, but it needs to be homemade - not the store bought corn syrup crap.

trip said...

Anon-
Thanks; I've been to Leon's, it's one of my favorite places in Atlanta, though I haven't gotten a Sazerac there before. Maybe I'll give theirs a try next time.

Ryan-
I can see the use of simple syrup, it certainly makes it faster to make, though, as he points out in the video, Chris McMillan notes that he prefers to use sugar cubes since it allows him to control the level of sweetness and not change the level of dilution. If you're making for yourself at home, though, I guess it's not that big of a concern.

Ryan Waldron said...

I make a super concentrated simple syrup. My sazeracs typically need a dash of water in addition to the simple syrup. The sugar just never seems to full dissolve for me in a cold drink. I hate gritty sugar mixed into an otherwise smooth drink. Also, I do not like Sazerac rye. its too sweet. I prefer Old Overholt.

Main Line Sportsman said...

Thanks for the lead to the Krewe stories...really enjoyed that set of posts.
Several places here in Phila. make a good Sazerac and I have enjoyed my share...

Death Bredon said...

I must confess that I have never had a Sazerac either. Perhaps it is because of my congenital preference for straight bourbon, or the fact that I have yet to try simple absinthe first.

Jerry Grasso said...

Isn't Buffalo Trace a Kentucky Brand? Did I mishear in the video? Or do they own a company down LA way....?

trip said...

Jerry-
According to Wikipedia, Sazerac owns Buffalo Trace Distillery, but I think that their rye is actually distilled in Kentucky. I was curious too when he mentioned that in the video, though.

Ryan-
I actually use Old Overholt as well.

Death Bredon said...

Buffalo Trace is located in Frankfort, Kentucky, about 30 minutes from where I sit right. Formerly, branded as Ancient Age, Buffalo Trace also distills the VanWinkle line of premium bourbons under contract.

Anonymous said...

Any connection to Rice University from which the glass hails?

trip said...

Anon-
Nope, just the first initial of my last name.

The Trot Line said...

Just bought a bottle of Sazerac Rye. It was great for sippin' and now I'm thirsty for an authentic Sazerac. Great post.